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Archive – Q2  week 6 – 19-20

Week of 12/9  – 12/13

12/9 – Monday – period  2/3
 
1: Return Volumetric Quiz
2. Gas Law Derivation Quiz – 15 minutes
3. Homework review
4. Pressure units – Pressure demo’s- Proof of atmospheric pressure.
 
Bordon gauge, sphygmomanometer, Glass with water/cardboard, Glass with water/without cardboard!, Large Flask and Cardboard
                                
                                      – period 4
1: Return Volumetric Quiz
2. Gas Law Derivation Quiz – 15 minutes
3. Pressure units – Pressure demo’s- Proof of atmospheric pressure.
     Crush the can – movie
 
Period 2/3 – Flask and the Cardboard:
 
SLOW MOTION: Crush the Can Demo:
 

 
For the units discussion:
Review of past Homework:
Gas Law worksheet 2 key.pdf

View Download 

 
Gas Law worksheet 4 key – honors chem.pdf
View Download
 
Intro Electrolytic Cells worksheet 3 key p.pdf
View Download
Gas Law Stiochiometry Density – 2009 AP Key.pdf
View Download
 

12/9 – Monday – Homework:
1:  Please view the lecture on Daltons Law in any speed but take notes on the derivation:
2:  Complete questions 1 and 3 only in the Gas Law worksheet 7 – Daltons Law.pdf worksheet.
       And Review with the key or Lecture below.
Gas Law worksheet 7 – Daltons Law.pdf
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Gas law worksheet 7 – Daltons Law Key.pdf
View Download
3:  Watch the Daltons Law Demo and Fire syringe demo and complete the form below:
 
Daltons law lecture: (do not listen to the instructions of which worksheet to complete at the end of this lecture)
 
Daltons worksheet review (questions 1,3):
 
 

Daltons Law Demo:

Fire syringe Demo:  proves that as pressure increase the temperature also increases
                                         That is why my demo above had a larger value of pressure than expected above                                          the extra air in the tube.


 
Form:   YES!!!!
 

Daltons Law of Partial Pressure Form 1920



End of Monday!

12/10 – Tuesday – period 2
 
 1. Crush the can demo review – movie in presentation
 
2. Review of Daltons Law:  video demos reviewed
 
3. LAB 15 – Determination of Molecular mass of Helium and Argon
Completed for He.
 
                                – period 3/4
 
1. Crush the can demo review – movie in presentation 
 
2.  Glass with water/cardboard, Glass with water/without cardboard!, Large Flask and Cardboard
 
Large Flask demo period 4 – Thanks Brandon
 

3.  

Review of Daltons Law: 
video demos reviewed
LAB 15 – Determination of Molecular mass of He and Argon
12/10 – Tuesday Homework:
1:  Please make a second submission to the Dalton’s Law Form that was Monday’s homework.  You should have had your 1st submission completed by Monday evening. I have graded and sent your responses back to you this AM. 
* If you did not complete the homework AND I did not get an email then you only get 1 submission.
* This second submission or first is due Tuesday at 4:30 am.
2.  Complete questions of 4 and 2 only in the Gas Law worksheet 7 – Daltons Law.pdf worksheet.
      Please do question 4 first and then question 2!
       
3. Review with the key or use the video posted below.
Gas Law worksheet 7 – Daltons Law.pdf
View Download
Gas law worksheet 7 – Daltons Law Key.pdf
View Download
End of Tuesday..

12/11 – Wednesday – period 2/3
 
*egg in bottle demo
1.  Review limitation in Tuesday night homework, question 7
 
2. LAB 15 – Determination of Molecular mass of He and Ar – 
    a) Evaluate Data – Complete calculations and hand in
    b) You may have to redo the gas measurement if really off.
 
3. Scuba Tanks, Brooklyn Bridge, and the Romans
4. Phase diagram
                                        – period 4
 
1. *egg in bottle demo
 
2. Scuba Tanks, Brooklyn Bridge, and the Romans
 
3. Phase diagram
 

Scuba diving and Gas Laws

Today’s Egg in and out of the bottle demo:
 
12/11 – Wednesday  Homework:
1:  Please complete the Gas Law Stiochiometry 2015.pdf worksheet and review with the key.
Think about how we solved the homework Tuesday night using Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure and the manometer (column of water).
Gas Law Stiochiometry 2015.pdf
View Download
 
Gas Law Stiochiometry key p.pdf
View Download
 End of Wednesday!        

12/12 – Thursday –  period 2
 
*Connections 
Review Scuba Tank partial pressures/ types of gas mixtures I added
Phase diagram of water into vapor pressure
 
*drinking Bird demo, multiple syringes, big vacuum flask
1. Kilopascal units – (kPa) – 
2. vapor pressure – 
3. Vacuum chamber – boiling
4. Distillation – 
5. butane in a baggie demo/ boiling cold
 
Vapor Pressure of Water table.pdf
View Download
 
                                    – period 3/4
*drinking Bird demo
1. Kilopascal units – (kPa) – 
2. vapor pressure – 
3. Vacuum chamber – boiling
4. Distillation – 
5. butane in a baggie demo/ boiling cold
 
2. Lab 16 – Determination of purity of quadrupled distilled Butane
 
Class notes on vapor pressure:
Notes:  Vapor pressure – slide 8 – 17 in Pressure Intro Presentation – posted at the end of today’s post.
 

Vapor Pressure is the Force per Area (F/A) created by gas molecules that have just evaporated from the liquid state.  This pressure of evaporating liquids depends on how well the molecules of the liquid attract each other.  These attractions are called IMF’s (Intermolecular Forces or Attraction).  The stronger the IMF between the molecules in the liquid the MORE that the liquid Resists evaporation AND THUS will evaporate less (at the same temperature) and thus produce LESS vapor pressure.
The strength of the IMF’s are unique for each liquid and thus each liquid has a unique vapor pressure curve.

Another important FACTOR in vapor pressure is the Temperature of the the liquid.  Even though each liquid has its own vapor pressure due to its unique strength of IMF’s, ALL LIQUIDS will increase their vapor pressure or evaporating due to an INCREASE in Temperature!!
An increase in Temperature is a result of an increase of energy that is absorbed AND will be used to free molecules from each other by breaking IMF’s.

*IMF’s ARE NOT BONDS!

All liquids have a unique vapor pressure curve based on how strong or week they ATTRACT each other.  
Example:  Propanone does not H-bond with itself but water does.  Water has Stronger IMF than propanone.
 
All liquids will increase their vapor pressure with an increase in Temperature.
Example:  Water has a lower vapor pressure than Propanone at the same temperature but they will both increase when temperature increases as IMF’s are broken.
 
Vapor pressure values will increase with increase of temperature 
until the vapor pressure EQUALs the Atmospheric pressure!
I like to think of boiling as the temperature which a liquid reached MAX EVAPORATION at a certain atmospheric Pressure.  What limits this temperature OR BOILING IS THE Atmospheric Pressure.  This means that every liquid can boil theoretically at any temperature!  If you look back at Table H, water can boil at 55 degrees Celsius if the Atmospheric pressure is 10 kPa (about .1 atm).  Lowering the atmospheric pressure will affect the boiling pint because you will need less vapor pressure to Equal or match the lowered atmospheric pressure.  Water will also boil at about 105 degrees when the atmospheric pressure is raised to 120 kPa (about 1.2 atm).  To combat this will usually talk about boiling in terms of STANDARD PRESSURE = 101.3 kPa or 1 atm or 760 torr or 14.7 psi.  In Table H above the horizontal line going across is the STANDARD atmospheric Pressure, thus when the vapor pressure of any liquid reached that line at standard pressure the temperature of the this boiling point is the NORMAL BOILING POINT. We compare liquids Normal Boiling points!
 
            Larger Normal Boiling Point    = Higher IMF’s = Lower Vapor Pressure                   WATER
            Smaller Normal Boiling Point   = Lower IMF’s = Higher Vapor Pressure             PROPANONE
 
Crude oil Refinery:

This is picture of a gasoline refinery that you can see in New Jersey as you travel south on the New Jersey Turnpike.

This is an example of  Fractional Distillation of Crude oil. Like all Distillation it is based on the different boiling points/vapor pressures of the mixtures of liquids that are being separated.  

Notice the tubes coming off the columns at different heights. This demonstrates the condensation of the vapors at different temperatures.  

Remember that boiling temperature (point) is equal to the condensation temperature.

Distillation Demo:
 
Baggie with butane demo:
 
 
Boiling cold water

 

Liquid evaporate on the desk demo:
 
 
12/12 – Thursday Homework: ( 3 parts)
1. Complete the Free Response AP Question below and review with the key.
     Notice I am incorporating equilibrium Keq (Kp) into our Gas Laws.  
     We learned that Keq can be called Kc (with molarities) or Kp (with partial pressures!)
 
     And the equilibrium constant is the Products over the reactants…………..
 
Gas Law Equilibrium 2014.pdf
View Download
 
Key.pdf
View Download
2. Read Notes above.
 
3.  Complete the Vapor Pressure Form below
 
Vapor Pressure Form:

Vapor Pressure Form 1920

 
End of Thursday!

12/13 – Friday –  period 2/3
 
analogy = opening a bottle of coke = bubbles appear = compression sickness = bends
 
*drinking Bird demo, multiple syringes/ LOVE METERS
 

1. 

Lab 16 – Determination of purity of quadrupled distilled Butane
                                period 4
 
*Review of last 2 nights homework WITH water displacement AND water vapor Table (values).
*drinking Bird demo, multiple syringes,  LOVE METERS
 
KPa derivation.
 
REview last nights form.
 

1.Lab 16 – 

Determination of purity of quadrupled distilled Butane
 
12/13 – Friday – Homework
 
1. Complete Lab 16 including the procedure.  It is due Monday 12/16.  I have posted a video below that will review it if you have any problems.
 
Lab 16 – Molecular Mass of butane Review video:
2. Please complete the new vapor pressure form .  I will take the better out of the 2 forms BUT YOU MUST DO BOTH!
 
For those who still are having troubles with this concept (vapor pressure) please view this lecture:
 


Vapor Pressure Form 2:
 

Vapor Pressure Form 2


3. 

Archimedes Principle STEM HOT AIR Balloon Lab Principles:
: Hot air Balloons Lab – Concepts
 
 
 Please view my lectures and demo’s on Archimedes Principle
1: Flask and pressure sensor:
 
2: Please watch the Lecture below on Archimedes Principle:
3: Please watch my demonstrations on the principle using the following playlist:
  
The boat Anchor log Riddle Demo
Archimedes Crown Demo
Archimedes Principle Demo

4. Complete the Archimedes Form Below: 

 

Archimedes Principle Form 1920


 



End of Week 6!